Video Phrase Definitions:

Digital Video Effects (DVE):

Digital video effects are effects that allow for a huge amount of manipulation with video imagery. DVE is similar to a device called an optical printer. Now optical printers are widely used in the film industry to help create special effects. DVE is different from optical printer because DVE is used mostly for special effects in TV broadcasting and sometimes live TV broadcasting.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_video_effect

Video Production Mixer:

A video production mixer, better known as the vision mixer, is used mostly in the post-production stage of digital effects. The video production mixer is used to switch between different video segments. For example, during a TV program scenes change constantly, not only do they just ‘change’, more often then not a transition effect is used between the two scenes such as dissolving and other transition effects. The video mixer is also used to combine multiple video segments using more of these transitions. This mixer is used much in the same way as an audio mixer.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vision_mixer
Source: Own Knowledge

Blue Screen Compositing:

Reserved for blue screen

Source: Link

Difference Between Normal and Live Studio Production:

Reserved for studio production

Source: Link

Aperture:

An aperture is a term used when using a camera. An aperture is a part of a camera that controls the opening in which light can pass through to the lens. The more light that passes through the aperture, the less focus there is in the image you are taking. However, the smaller the opening, the finer and more focused the image becomes.

Source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_an_aperture_on_a_camera
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aperture

Aspect Ratio:

Aspect ratio applies to a number of things such as computer screens, TV screens, pictures, videos and so on. The aspect ratio is measured first by the width and then by high, in other words the x and the y axis of an image. A popular aspect ratio that is widely used with HD TV’s is the ratio of 16:9. Larger aspect ratios such as 1.85:1 and 2.39:1 are used in cinemas and theaters to give a much larger and sharper picture. The aspect ratio of 16:9 can be used for a number of different size images. To put it more clearly, if you had two images and one had a size of 16cm by 9cm and the other had a size of 16″ by 9″, the aspect ratio will still be 16:9. Aspect ratio can also be expressed through pixels such as 800×600.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)
Source: Own Knowledge

Chroma Key:

Reserved for chroma key

Source: Link

Cinematography:

Cinematography has a simple explanation but what a Cinematographer does is quite in-depth. Cinematography is the actual making of images and videos that are intended for the use in cinema. In other words, the making of a cinema movie. A Cinematographer is the person who is responsible for the use of camera, filters, lighting and so on. They work closely with the producers and directors of a cinematic movie to ensure that the movie is shot to the spec of the director.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinematography
Source: Own Knowledge

Codec:

Reserved for codec

Source: Link

Contrast Ratio:

The contrast ratio refers to the display of a system, commonly on TV units. Contrast ratio is the ratio of the brightest white to that of the darkest black that the system can handle. A ratio of 10000:1 is generally seen on Plasma and HD TV’s. This ratio means that the brightest white is 10000 more brighter than the darkest black, which in turn, gives of a bright display. Most TV units give the choice to change the contrast ratio of the TV. Therefore, it is effectively making the display lighter or darker, depending on your preference. A high contrast display is very popular and default on most systems as it give off a very clear and vibrant display.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contrast_ratio
Source: http://askville.amazon.com/contrast-ratio-worst/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=4666091

Video Effects Compared to Transitions:

Reserved for effects and transitions

Source: Link

Dailies/Rushes:

Dailies is a word that refers to the pure raw and unedited footage that is taken during the filming of a movie/film. The reason why this word is used is because at the end of ever day of filming, the raw footage is developed and put onto film. This film is then viewed by the director and some of the cast members to give a better scope on how the movie and it’s actors are progressing throughout the filming process. The word ‘rushes’ simply refers to how quickly the footage is developed.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dailies

Dolly:

A dolly is a very important piece of equipment used when shooting a motion picture/film/TV show. A dolly is a metal frame that is mounted on a track. A camera is then mounted on the dolly along with a camera operator to control the camera. The benefit of doing this is so you can get smooth camera movements. Because the dolly is on a track, and the camera is mounted on the dolly, there is less shaking, giving you a much smoother view through the camera. Not only that but because the dolly is on a track, the dolly can be moved wherever it wants to. For example, if you are filming a chase scene between two people, you can follow the action using the dolly.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camera_dolly

Dropout:

Reserved for dropout

Source: Link

Dry Run:

Dry run is a term used for testing. This term is not only used in video but for everything. However, in terms of video, testing or ‘a dry run’ will need to be conducted to see if there are any defects within the video. For example, when filming, you record the sound along with the video, a dry run will need to be done to make sure the sound has been recorded correctly and there are no jumps in the volume of sound.

Source: Own Knowledge

DV/MiniDV:

DV is the format for digital recording and the ability to play digital video. The DV (digital video) is the standard protocol used by some digital camcorders. There are a number of variation to the traditional DV such as DVCPro and DVCam. More to add…reserve for miniDV

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DV

Edit Decision List (EDL):

An edit decision list is a process used after all filming has finished. This process is editing the existing film or video. The list contains the reels and time-codes of the film, which has been ordered correctly so it is easily found when it comes round to the final cut of the film. There are a huge amount of decisions that need to be made during this final cut. Segments of the reel could be cut and merged with other segments. This process will most likely include some of the DVE and Video Mixer processes. When EDL first came about in films, programs could not handle the process to edit and playback high quality images. As a result, the quality was reduced during the EDL process. These days however, programs and computers are powerful enough to playback high quality videos, making the EDL process easier and more efficient.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DV
Source: http://www.steves-digicams.com/knowledge-center/how-tos/photo-software/final-cut-pro-what-are-edit-decision-lists.html
Source: Own Knowledge
Offline EDL Source
Normal EDL Source

Floor Manager:

A floor manager is a member of staff that has control over the floor of a television studio. A floor manger is in charge of where the camera are, the sets used and goes back and fourth between the floor and the control room. When going back between the floor and the control room, the floor manager talks with the director and other produces on what is happening on the floor. The floor manager has a number of responsibilities including, lighting, making announcements to the staff and audience and making sure that the floor is clear (generally for health and safety purposes).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floor_manager

Fly on the Wall:

Fly on the wall is a very unique style of filming, generally used in documentaries and TV shows. The fly on the wall style filming is done by using automatic camera that do not need to be controlled my other people. In other words, the camera might be mounted to the wall and filming constantly. The benefit of this is so there are no people getting in the way of the camera and so the people who are being filmed can act naturally without be distracted by a mass of producers and so on. A good example of this style of filming is the show Big Brother. Big Brother used wall mounted camera that can be moved and pivoted from a remote location.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fly_on_the_wall
Source: Own Knowledge

Framing:

Reserved for framing

Source: Link

Frames Per Second (FPS):

FPS has a number of different meanings, the two most popular is First Person Shooter and Frames Per Second. Frames per second (FPS) is a term widely used in the media industry. FPS is how many frames of a moving image run in a single second. Most moving images a made up of a large number of frames. Most games these days run at 60fps which gives for smooth computer game animations and movies. The most FPS a person can see is 24. Most TV sows and film use one of the three standard frame rates, either 24p, 25p, or 30p. May video and film developers use 24p where recording because of the low frame rare look it gives off. This low frame rate is used in most films and recordings.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frame_rate#Frame_rates_in_film_and_television
Source: Own Knowledge

Gaffer:

A gaffer is a job title used in the film/video making industry. A gaffer is an electrician that is often the head of the electrical department. The gaffer will be in charge or lighting, this doesn’t sound like much there is a lot involved. For example, the gaffer will be able to transform the effects of midday into a nice sunset just by using lighting. There are many different effects that the gaffer is able to do. Not only does the gaffer deal with lighting effects but also the cables that are used to connect up computers, lights, cameras and so on.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaffer_(filmmaking)

Hyper-focal Distance:

Reserved for hyper-focal distance

Source: Link

Jump Cut:

Reserved for jump cut

Source: Link

Monitor:

Reserved for monitor

Source: Link

Doddies:

Reserved for doddies

Source: Link

Non-Linear Editing:

Non-Linear Editing (NLD) is an editing method used in the post production stage of filming. The good thing about this type of editing is that you can jump to any frame in a digital video clip. This means you wont need to play the whole clip to get to the part you want to edit. The reason why you can jump to any frame in a clip is because the clip is normally saved on a hard disk or other storage device instead of normal reels of film. The editing of a clip that is saved on a reel is known as linear because you have to watch through the reel to get the part you wish to edit.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-linear_editing_system

Out-Point:

Reserved for out-point

Source: Link

PAL vs. NTSC:

PAL is an analog television colour encoding system used in broadcasting to TV systems in a selection of countries. The PAL analog system is used throughout all of the UK, most of Europe and half of the South of America.
Still need more info…reserved…

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAL
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC
PAL vs. NTSC Image

Pan:

Pan is a method used most likely in the post production stage of filming. This method is used for adjusting wide-screen film so that they fit on standard TV units with the standard definition aspect ratio of 4:3. They way this is done is by cropping the original video images to fit this size. However, cropping has to be right to make sure that you are left with the key aspects of the original video image. Some producers and directors hate to use this method because you can loose anything up to 45% of the original video image. In turn this can drastically change the effect a movie or video is supposed to have on its targeted audience.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_and_scan
Pan Image

Quicktime:

Quicktime is a media player created by Apple Inc. The Quicktime media player is capable of supporting and processing a large amount of formats including, pictures, sounds and videos.

Source: Own Knowledge

Real Time:

Real time is a method used in media where the length of a story in a film is the same length in real life time. For example, if daily TV program has been shot in real time for 6 years, the actors features will be 6 years older at the end of it. The way TV shows are normally shot is one episode is shot on a normal day and just a couple of episodes later its Christmas in the episode. Real time filming of this would be all the days in-between the normal day and Christmas day being shot. Therefore, you get the full story in complete real time.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_time_(media)
Source: Own Knowledge

Scene:

A scene is pretty simple to explain. A scene contains a series of events shot in a single location. The difference between one scene and another is normally the environment. For example, one scene could be in a park with some dialog and so on. The next scene would be somewhere completely different like a shop. The dialog is normally slightly off topic to solidify the fact that there is a separate scene.

Source: Own Knowledge

Suspension of Disbelief:

Reserved for suspension of disbelief

Source: Link

Televise:

Reserved for televise

Source: Link

Test Pattern:

A test pattern, also known as a test card is a television test signal. This test signal is generally used when there is no other programs showing on that television channel. The test cards are also used to test a broadcast signal and identify problems with the signal itself.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Test_pattern
Source: Own Knowledge

Timecode:

Timecode in video production and filming is used a lot for synchronizing, logging and identifying materials inside selected media. While filming something, the cameraman will most likely have a laptop connected to the camera which is used to log the start and end timecodes of a shoot.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timecode

White Balance:

White balance is the global change in the intensity of the colour in images and videos. These colours that you change are the primary colours red, green and blue. The whole idea of doing this is to render neutral colours properly, therefore, making the image much more presentable.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_balance

Widescreen:

Widescreen images and videos have bigger aspect ratio than most other images and videos. Most broadcasting images and videos and at a ratio of 4:3. However, the aspect ratio for widescreen is considerably bigger. The aspect ratio used for wide screen is 1:37:1. Any ratios that are above 4:3 are considered to be widescreen displays.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wide_screen

Wrap:

Wrap is a term used by the director in film making. The term ‘it’s a wrap’ is used at the end of a filming session

Source: Own Knowledge

Portmanteau:

Reserved for portmanteau

Source: Own Knowledge