The Shining

Key Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081505/

Film details:

The Shining is a film created in the year 1980 by Stanley Kubrick. Writers for this film include Stephen King who wrote the novel, Stanley Kubrick and Diane Johnson.

The Shining is about a family of 3 who move into an empty hotel to look after it during the winter. The son of this family has a hidden gift called Shining which allows him to see things that have happened in the past and what can possibly happen in the future. Not only that but he can also have telepathic conversations with other people who have the Shining. The father of the family wishes to use this time to continue his writing. However, his mind starts to slip into insanity as a result of cabin fever. Ghosts of the hotel start to appear and Jack (father) starts to talk to them. A ghost waiter, who appears to be the father who killed his family a long time previously, appears to Jack and persuades him to ‘correct’ his family. At this point Jack finally looses it and attempts to kill his wife and son.

Again in this film there is not clear message. The hidden message that could be pointed out is how much cabin fever can effect someone. I say this because at the beginning of the film Jack seems like such a normal person and it seems like he wouldn’t be the person that would loose his mind. This however, is not the case. So therefore, the message would be, be careful of being kept in solitude and confined spaces.

Production details:

The Shining has 4 production companies which are Warner Bros. Pictures, Hawk Films, Peregrine and Producers Circle. The majority of distributors are part of the Warner Bros. Company which control distribution in different countries. Click here for the full list of distributors and special effects companies.

The film is aimed at those who have an interest in horror. It is also aimed at the over 18s due to the fact of bad language, nudity and violence.

Below is a list of technological uses used in the film. Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081505/technical

Camera

  • Arriflex 35 BL, Zeiss Super Speed Lenses

Laboratory

  • Denham Laboratories, UK

Film length (metres)

  • 3275 m (Sweden, cut version)
  • 3295 m (Finland) (theatrical version)
  • 3970 m (Finland) (original version)

Film negative format (mm/video inches)

  • 35 mm (Eastman 100T 5247)

Cinematographic process

  • Spherical

Printed film format

  • 35 mm

Aspect ratio

  • 1.37 : 1 (negative ratio)
  • 1.66 : 1 (theatrical ratio, Europe)
  • 1.85 : 1 (theatrical ratio, USA)

The estimated budget for The Shining was $22,000,000.

Reception

The Shining only won one award and was nominated for 2 other awards. Click here for the full list of awards and nominations. The film was rated number 48 in the top 250 films.

The Shining was rated 18 dues to the violence and nudity in the film. Therefore, no one under the age of 18 should watch this film.

Summary

The thing that I found most distinctive about this film is the different camera panning and angles. For example, the first scene when the camera pans overhead of a lake and then a highway before it follows a yellow car. I love the way this is done because it just makes the movie that more dynamic. It also makes the viewer much more intrigued as they get an idea of the surroundings of the film and then makes them wonder, why is the car being followed. It draws a lot of attention on the car and makes us think, where is the car going and so on. Another camera angle that I really love is the where the camera is behind the child whenever he is riding his back. This, in a horror film is great. The reason I say this is because the camera is behind the child and the child is driving round the corners of the hallway of the hotel. The effect this has on the viewer is it makes you think, ‘oh whats round the next corner’. This camera angle is also used whenever a character in the movie is running, adding more to the dynamic and desperation of the run.

http://screencrave.frsucrave.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/the-shining-sequel-24-11-09-kc.jpg

The element of the movie I would take is the camera angles and panning. I love the way the film uses the panning over landscapes and I would love to do this in some of my productions. I would like to do panning over a place like London or somewhere similar. The element that I would really take is the behind camera shots and the camera following running movements. It adds a lot of dynamic to a scene.

Bibliography

Reserved for bibliography

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Bladerunner

Key Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083658/

Film details:

Bladerunner is a film directed by Ridley Scott in 1982. Writers include Hampton Fancher, David Webb Peoples and Philip K. Dick. The film is based on Philip K. Dick’s novel ‘Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?’.

Bladerunner is a futuristic, sci-fi, thriller film set in LA in the year 2019. Humans have manged to make human clones known as replicants. These replicants are used in colonies outside planet earth to do labour and other talks. These replicants also have a very short lifespan of only 4 years, this is so the replicants don’t gain emotions. Deckard (played by Harrison Ford) is a retired ‘Bladerunner’. A Bladerunner is a specialist police officer whos job it is to kill replicants. Deckard is pulled out of retirement to hunt down 4 replicants that have escaped and hijacked a ship back to earth.

After having watched the film I can see that there is no real clear message to this film. Having said that, there maybe a tiny hidden message. Deckard has sped most of his life killing replicants and it get halfway through the film and he falls for one of them. The message in this could be that looks can be deceiving. Another small message could be that playing god by creating replicants is wrong. These replicants have every trait that a human has and it can even learn emotions.

Production details:

The Bladerunner film has 5 major production companies. These are The Ladd Company, Shaw Brothers, Warner Bros. Pictures, Michael Deeley Production, Ridley Scott Productions. The last 2 production companies are actually combined to make A Michael Deeley-Ridley Scott Production. There are also a huge amount of distribution companies, most of which are Warner Bros. distribution from different countries. Click here for the link to the full list of distributions and special effects companies.

This film is aimed at those with an interest in sci-fi and futuristic films. It is also aimed at the over 18s due to that fact of mild violence and partial nudity.

Below is a list of technological uses used in the film. Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083658/technical

Camera

  • Arriflex 35 III
  • Arriflex 535

Laboratory
Camera

  • Panavision Cameras and Lenses

Laboratory

  • Technicolor, USA

Film length (metres)

  • 3193 m (Sweden) (director’s cut)
  • 3200 m (Sweden)

Film negative format (mm/video inches)

  • 65 mm (special effects) (Eastman 100T 5247)
  • 35 mm (Eastman 100T 5247)

Cinematographic process

  • Panavision (anamorphic)

Printed film format

  • D-Cinema (2007 “Final Cut” release)
  • 35 mm
  • 70 mm (blow-up)

Aspect ratio

  • 2.20 : 1 (70 mm prints)
  • 2.35 : 1

The estimated budget for Bladerunner was $28,000,000.

Reception

Bladerunner was nominated for 2 Oscars without winner but won 9 other awards an nominated for another 15 awards. It was ranked 119th in the top 250 films. Click here for a link to the full list of awards.

The certificate given to this film is R because of the violence and nudity. There have been a number of other different certificates given to this film for many other countries. Below is the list of other certificates given.

Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083658/parentalguide#certification

Canada:13+ (Quebec) / Canada:A (Nova Scotia) / Canada:AA (Ontario) / Canada:PA (Manitoba) / Italy:T / Germany:12 (re-rating) (2007) / Brazil:14 / West Germany:16 (f) / Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) / Ireland:15A / New Zealand:M / Denmark:15 (original rating) / Spain:13 / Canada:14+ (TV rating) (Final Cut) / Chile:14 / UK:15 (video rating) (1986) / Argentina:16 / Australia:M / Finland:K-16 / France:-12 / Ireland:15 / Israel:PG / Japan:R-15 (director’s cut) / Netherlands:16 (director’s cut) / Norway:15 / Peru:18 / Singapore:NC-16 / South Korea:18 / Sweden:15 / UK:AA (original rating) / USA:R / USA:R (1991 version) / USA:R (Definitive Cut) / Norway:16 (original rating) / Iceland:16

Summary

The thing that I noticed straight away from the opening to the film was the 3D CGI graphics used. The film is set in an American city in the future and therefore amendments need to be made to the true city. Obviously this cannot be done in really life but it can be done with 3D special effects. The 3D graphics in the film are used to enhance the existing city to make it look more futuristic. For example, in a couple of scenes there is a pyramid sort of building with loads of light and looks very futuristic. This is done through the 3D graphics. During the opening movie, the camera pans over the city. This camera panning is actually of the real city but is visually enhanced. For example, there are special effects such as fire and flying cars put into the original video of the city to give it a more futuristic look.

The element of the movie I would use in my own projects is quite obviously the 3D modeling and the computerized special effects. I have always had an interest in 3D modeling because it really can give so much more to a movie production. Not only that but I would quite like to use this make an entire film. The reason why I would use special effects in my future productions is because some things really are not possible in real life. For example, you cannot destroy a building or something similar in real life, it is possible but not done often. Therefore, special effects will be used to create the explosion and the building falling. I love fantasy films and obviously fantasy creatures and building wont really exist. This is another situation I would use 3D modeling and special effects.

http://www.altfg.com/blog/film-reviews/blade-runner-harrison-ford-ridley-scott/

Bibliography

Reserved for bibliography

Schindler’s List

Key Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108052/

Film details:

Schindler’s List is a film created in 1993 by director Steven Spielberg and writers Thomas Keneally and Steven Zaillian.

Schindler’s List is based on a true story where a man named Oskar Schindler, a member of the Nazi party, attempts at creating a business where he employees Jews to do all the work where he gets all the money. However, things start to change when he starts feeling for his Jewish workers. As a result he creates a list of names of Jews which he intends to buy using all his money. He takes these Jews to a factory he owns in his hometown away from the Nazis to work. He uses the rest of his money to bribe Nazi officials to keep what he is doing under wraps.

The key message of this film is to shed light and focus on the amazing good deeds performed by the real Oskar Schindler during World War 2. The message I can see myself in this film is that people are not always what they seem and that even if someone seems bad on the outside, it doesn’t mean the same is on the inside. The way this message is put across is through the little girl in red. Spielberg has said that he used the girl in red as an indication that Schindler has changed. He also mentioned that the little girl in red is to represent the blood of all Jewish people. The blood of the Jewish people were on the radar of the English, Americans and Russians but they did nothing to help them.

Production details:

The production companies for this film are Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment. There are also a huge number of individual distribution companies such as United International Picture and CIC Video. Click here for the full list of distributors, special effects and other companies.

The certificate for this film is 15 which means that no one under the age of 15 is suitable to watch this film. Therefore, the target audience is over 15 years of ages. Not only that but this film is also targeted at those who have an interest in world war history, Oskar Schindler and the history of the holocaust.

Below is a list of tecnological uses used in the film. Source: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108052/technical

Camera

  • Arriflex 35 III
  • Arriflex 535

Laboratory

  • DeLuxe, USA (prints)
  • Arri Contrast GmbH, Germany

Film negative format (mm/video inches)

  • 35 mm (Eastman)

Cinematographic process

  • Spherical

Printed film format

  • 35 mm (spherical)

Aspect ratio

  • 1.85 : 1

The estimated budget for Schindler’s List was $25,000,000.

Reception

Schindler’s List won 7 Oscars, 65 other awards and nominated for 23 other awards. Overall a very successful film. Click here for the full list of awards given to Schindler’s List.

The only certificate given to this film was 15 worldwide. This certificate means that the film cannot be viewed by persons under the age of 15.

Summary

The main thing I noticed about the film was the fact that the whole film is in black and white. I have a theory on why Spielberg shot the movie in black and white and thats because the time of the movie is set back in the 1940s. Therefore, Spielberg shot the film in black and white to give the viewers the feeling that the film is set in an older time. The other thing that is very distinctive about this film is the fact that it is based on a real story and even et in the real locations, not fake builds and so on. Theres a benefit to making a movie based on a real story and that benefit is that it intrigues people to watch the movie. It makes the audience think they need to find out what the real story is and how it is portrayed through the big screen.
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There are a number of elements the movie uses that I would love to use in some of my future production. The first of which is the black and white filming. I love how black and white filming along with old age grainy effect works in film. It gives a film a sense of history and I like that. I also like the fact that there are no colours at all and lets you focus just on the movie and no bright and off putting colours. Having said that, during Schindler’s List there is a scene with a little girl in red with everything else still black and white. This draws focus on the girl in a dark and damp black and white movie. I love this idea, its a great way to bring in a ‘little’ colour to certain elements of a black and white movie. I would like to use this some time in a black and white movie as it draws significance to that particular element in the movie.

Bibliography

Reserved for bibliography