Graphic Phrase Definition:

Bitmap vs. Vector:

A bitmap image is a map of pixels put together to make an image. Each one of those pixels has its own colour. When you try to enlarge the size of a bitmap image, it will become very pixelated and you will lose a lot of quality. Bitmap images have a restricted colour pallet of only 256 colours. A vector image can be scaled up and down as much as you want and you will never lose the quality in the image. Vectors have an unlimited colour pallet which also adds to the lossless of quality. I have had experience with both of these types of images and I think vectors are better. The reason i say this is that the good differences between bitmaps and vectors. First of all, vectors have a much bigger colour pallet which gives off good, constant quality. Not only that but vector files are normally smaller in size than bitmaps.

Source: Own Knowledge
Source: Own previous coursework

CPU:

CPU stands for central processing unit. The CPU in a computer basically acts like a brain of a human beings. The CPU takes in information and processes it and sends it back to the programs and applications running on the computer. The program of a computer gives the CPU the information requesting it to be processed. The better the processor the quicker the CPU can processes multiple segments of information at one time.

Source: Own Knowledge

Driver:

A driver is whats installed onto a computer when and external device interacts with the computer. If the external device is to be used with the computer then a device is automatically installed. Most of the time, a driver is installed when a device with a USB has been plugged into the computer. For example, if you had a digital camera and wanted to put pictures onto your computer, you would plug the camera into the computer with a USB cable. Once the cable has been connected you will be give a message stating that the computer is searching and installing the correct driver, so the device can be used.

Source: Own Knowledge

Dots Per Inch (DPI):

Reserved for dots per inch (DPI)

Source: Link

Font:

A font is the style in which the whole alphabet of letters is presented onto a document. There are millions of different fonts and new ones can be downloaded and created. TrueType is the file type used for fonts. A TrueType file will contain the whole alphabet in the the font face. Not only that but most TrueType files have the bold and italic versions included too. Fonts are pretty much graphics that have been created into letters and out into a file type that is recognized by computers.

Source: Own Knowledge

Typography:

Typography is considered as a type of art. Typography includes the arrangement of letter, letter spacing, font type, size and so on. Typographers do not consider themselves as designers because they do not design the font faces, they just arrange the way letters and words are viewed on paper or computer.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typography

Firewire:

Reserved for firewire

Source: Link

Universal Serial Bus (USB):

USB is a world know standard that defines and accepts the cables used as connectors to connect an external device with a computer. There are a number of different things that can be connected to a computer, but none the less, all things that are connected to the computer by a cable, will have a USB end. For example, keyboards, cameras, mouses and so on can be connected through USB.

Source: Own Knowledge
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usb

JPEG:

JPEG is a very commonly used file type for saving images. Even camera that take still photos will save the image as a JPEG. JPEGS are so popular because when resizing an image there is very little lose of quality. Not only that, but manually changing the quality of a JPEG image will also result in a small amount of quality lost. However, if you put the quality down further than about 50% then you will start to notice quality lose (Own experience).

Source: Own Knowledge

JPEG:

Morphing is a special effect that is used in animation and motions pictures. The special effect is the transition and morphing between one image/object and another. This transition is normally very smooth.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morphing
Source: Own Knowledge

Pixel:

A pixel is a single element that makes up part of an image. When you zoom in enough into an object you will often get to see small squares, each with a different colour. All these pixels together build an image, the more pixels you have to create the image or a part of an image makes the image generally sharper. When viewing pixels zoomed in, normally you will view them inside a grid. This grid separates each pixel by a very fine, but distinctive line. This helps with finely editing an image.

Source: Own Knowledge

Composition:

Reserved for composition

Source: Link

RAM:

RAM stands for random access memory. Need more, reserved for RAM

Source: Link

Rasterize:

Rasterisation is the technique of taking a vector image or shape and converting it into a raster image (pixels). The reason for doing this is so the image can be used in video displays. Some shapes that you insert into Adobe Photoshop need to be raterized or when editing the shape, it can become very pixelated just like a bitmap.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rasterize
Source: Own Knowledge

Resolution:

Resolution can mean a number of things. First definition is a computer screen resolution, which is the size of the display area of a computer. This is normally measured in pixels (1366×768 for example). The second meaning has more to do with graphics and that is the resolution of an actual image. More often than not, the resolution of an image is also measured in pixels but can also be measured in centimeters and inches. The resolution of an image is the area the image covers, for example 300×600 pixels.

Source: Own Knowledge

RGB vs. CMYK:

Reserved for RGB vs. CMYK

Source: Link

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